1. beyoncescock:

    seven billion people on this planet and i have 2 friends

    (via nevermind-the-witchcraft)

    1 minute ago  /  375,105 notes  /  Source: beyoncescock

  2. aworldoftheversusepic:

    When you try the hardest not to wake up your parents
    image

    (via nevermind-the-witchcraft)

    1 minute ago  /  338,251 notes  /  Source: itsbolin

  3. sexi-loki:

This teacher wins at life.

    sexi-loki:

    This teacher wins at life.

    21 hours ago  /  89 notes  /  Source: sexi-loki

  4. mindblowingscience:

Fossil footprints found in B.C. paint new picture of T-Rex

Fossilized footprints uncovered in northeastern British Columbia suggest the ferocious tyrannosaurs that ruled the Earth 70 million years ago just may have been more gregarious than than they’ve been given credit for.
The trio of footprints preserved in a remote ridge of rock near Tumbler Ridge, B.C., is the first foot track evidence that the saw-toothed beasts were not solitary, but travelled in packs.
Richard McCrea, of the Peace Region Palaeontology Research Centre, says the tyrannosaur trails were exposed by heavy rains in the region in 2011 and the first two footprints were discovered by a local guide outfitter that October.
The guide immediately reported the find and over the next year, McCrea and his team uncovered five more tyrannosaurid tracks and dozens of other dinosaur footprints preserved so well that skin imprints are visible.
Each footprint is more than half a metre long, and paleontologists estimate the trio were 26, 29 and 25 years old.
Research on the Tumbler Ridge fossils is published in the latest edition of the scientific journal PLOS One.

    mindblowingscience:

    Fossil footprints found in B.C. paint new picture of T-Rex

    Fossilized footprints uncovered in northeastern British Columbia suggest the ferocious tyrannosaurs that ruled the Earth 70 million years ago just may have been more gregarious than than they’ve been given credit for.

    The trio of footprints preserved in a remote ridge of rock near Tumbler Ridge, B.C., is the first foot track evidence that the saw-toothed beasts were not solitary, but travelled in packs.

    Richard McCrea, of the Peace Region Palaeontology Research Centre, says the tyrannosaur trails were exposed by heavy rains in the region in 2011 and the first two footprints were discovered by a local guide outfitter that October.

    The guide immediately reported the find and over the next year, McCrea and his team uncovered five more tyrannosaurid tracks and dozens of other dinosaur footprints preserved so well that skin imprints are visible.

    Each footprint is more than half a metre long, and paleontologists estimate the trio were 26, 29 and 25 years old.

    Research on the Tumbler Ridge fossils is published in the latest edition of the scientific journal PLOS One.

    21 hours ago  /  61 notes  /  Source: ctvnews.ca

  5. photo

    photo

    22 hours ago  /  135 notes  /  Source: CNN

  6. fastcompany:

Americans Are More Skeptical About Climate Change Than Any Other Nation
Only 54% of Americans blame humans for global warming. In other news, 46% of Americans have heads stuck in the sand.
Read More>

    fastcompany:

    Americans Are More Skeptical About Climate Change Than Any Other Nation

    Only 54% of Americans blame humans for global warming. In other news, 46% of Americans have heads stuck in the sand.

    Read More>

    22 hours ago  /  192 notes  /  Source: fastcoexist.com

  7. 22 hours ago  /  200 notes  /  Source: thedragoninmygarage

  8. 22 hours ago  /  294 notes  /  Source: nikolateslaisawesome

  9. amnhnyc:

The Atlas moth is our featured moth of the day as we celebrate National Moth Week.
Did you know? Primitive moths appeared 195 million years ago, during the Jurassic period. Since then, more than 150,000 known species of moths have evolved in diverse colors, shapes, and sizes ranging from the European pygmy sorrel moth, with a wingspan of just 0.1 inch (3 millimeters), to the Atlas moth of Southeast Asia, whose wingspan can reach up to 12 inches (30 centimeters).
Learn more moth facts! 

    amnhnyc:

    The Atlas moth is our featured moth of the day as we celebrate National Moth Week.

    Did you know? Primitive moths appeared 195 million years ago, during the Jurassic period. Since then, more than 150,000 known species of moths have evolved in diverse colors, shapes, and sizes ranging from the European pygmy sorrel moth, with a wingspan of just 0.1 inch (3 millimeters), to the Atlas moth of Southeast Asia, whose wingspan can reach up to 12 inches (30 centimeters).

    Learn more moth facts

    22 hours ago  /  230 notes  /  Source: amnhnyc